Value Propositions

All value propositions should have quantitative components that fall into at least one of four benefit categories.

Hard Cost Savings

  • Reduced expenditures paid to third parties
  • Lower unit prices
  • Lower volume of consumption

Productivity Gains

  • Time saved per activity
  • Total activities reduced
  • Reduced number of people required

Revenue Growth

  • Incremental leads
  • Higher conversion rates
  • Larger deal sizes
  • More deals booked
  • Higher renewal rates

Risk Mitigation

  • Fewer incidents
  • Reduced penalties and fines
  • Avoided brand degradation

As you formulate your value models within or across these benefit categories, be prepared to demonstrably present to the buyer organization CFO, CIO and other C Level executives, how each of the individual components add up to the larger ROI number. Your product or services’ expense should ideally be funded through the savings, gains, revenue projections or mitigated risk.

Present your case and pricing as if you are the buyer of your solution.  With the right package, your buyer will be considered a hero within their organization for bringing your product, at a steal price.

Building Value Propositions: Leverage What Works

We know that many sellers are able to win business without ROI tools. Sellers are good at telling stories. Sellers like their PowerPoint presentations.

Typically, sales presentations contain 3 to 5 core value propositions statements which sales reps are good at learning and re-telling. Often those core value propositions are represented effectively with icons and images.

While our platform is flexible enough to generate any visualization or output, we leverage the existing marketing and sales assets that have been proven to work in the field.